Another DIY Adirondack Set on the Cheap

DIY Adirondack Chairs and Table Pin

We are so excited building things for our new abode! Directly across the street is a lovely, wildflower, rabbit, squirrel and bird abundant park. We've decided to rid our lives of cable t.v., which affords us way more extra time than I realized, or care to admit. Instead of vegging out to the news upon awakening, we enjoy our morning coffee on the front porch in our super comfy adirondack set that we built with our own hands! We are forced to be more present and enjoy one another and nature more than ever, but the benefits of minimizing screen time are out of the scope of this article. I just want to talk about awesome adirondack-ness!DIY Adirondack Chairs Stools and Table

DIY Outdoor Furniture

This whole set took us a week, a few hours a day or so. We built the exact same set we shared in this DIY Adirondack Set post, so you can find the plan there.

DIY Adirondack Table

We changed the color scheme. I used Rustoleum Vintage Teal for the table. I found outdoor pillows at Walmart for $5 each that tied everything together!

DIY Adirondack Chair Woodworking Plan

Here is the first chair finished. Notice all the screw holes we had to fill before painting! I prefer Fast'N Final by DAP.

Chalk Painted DIY Adirondack Chair Set

For the chairs and stools, I used Rustoleum Chalked in Linen White. It took 3 coats, which in my experiences is a lot for chalk paint. All in all, I am happy with the product and will use it again.

All five pieces were sealed with Minwax Polycrylic Water Based Protective Finish. It is my go to!

Facebook Adirondack DIY How to build Adirondack Chairs

We love our new set, and our mornings spent together, present and peaceful!

DIY Wood Shim Bookcase

    Image 1   Whether it’s shiplap or pallet wood, rustic farmhouse-inspired accents and furnishings are on trend. But before you head out to find expensive aged wood, try this wood shim tutorial instead. You’ll find out how to incorporate that farmhouse signature look without breaking the bank with this simple, inexpensive and removable DIY for any bookcase.   You’ll only need one tool, a handful of materials and a couple of hours to elevate a plain bookcase into something so much more. Stacked alternating wood shims provide the texture, and a plywood base gives you the option to attach the panels using tape, making this DIY removable and commitment-free.   Supplies For this project, you’ll need:  
  • A bookcase (We choose one in a modern style, but you can use one that matches your home’s decor)
  • (1) 1/4”x 2 x 4 sanded plywood sheet
  • 2-4 packages of 15” cedar shims
  • Wood glue
  • Grey tone wood stain
  • Paintbrush
  • Mounting tape
  • Jigsaw
  • C-clamps
  • Tape measure
  • Pencil
  Step One: Pick Up a Modern Bookcase   Image 2   Finding the right bookcase for this project is all about maintaining visual balance. The clean, modern shape of this bookcase is the perfect backdrop to showcase the natural, rustic quality of the cedar shims.   Since this project involves attaching wood panels to your bookcase, you’ll want to make sure that the bookcase you buy can support the amount of wood you want to add without becoming too heavy. It helps to start out with a lightweight bookcase and limit the wood shims to just the back panels of the bookshelf. Assemble your bookcase and measure the size of the space you want to cover using your tape measure.   Step Two: Cut the Wood to Size   Image 3   Take that measurement and trace it onto the plywood sheet twice. Cut out both rectangles using the jigsaw and set aside.   Next, you’ll need to determine the pattern you want for the wood shim accent panels. You can choose a classic brick pattern, basket weaving pattern or a simple alternating stacked pattern. I chose the latter because it followed the lines of the bookcase and provided a higher-quality finish. Mark and cut each cedar shim to match the width of the cut plywood rectangles. You’ll want to alternate thick and thin sides when stacking to maximize the play on texture and the farmhouse feel. You may need to cut the last wood shim lengthways to finish out the space. Go slow when cutting with the jigsaw to reduce any wood splitting or chipping.   Step Three: Glue and Stain   Image 4   Once you cut all of your wood shims, you can begin adhering them to the cut plywood pieces. Brush a light coating of wood glue onto the back of the shims and press them down onto the wood backing. Be sure to immediately clean up any excess glue that leaks out, as it can affect how the wood stain reacts with the wood. Clamp another piece of wood to the top of the wood panel to provide consistent, even pressure while the glue dries overnight. An optional improvement is to use small finishing nails to secure the wood shims to the plywood base.   Image 5   The next day, you can start applying the wood stain to the wood panels in light, even coats. Let the stain sit and penetrate the wood for a few minutes before wiping up the excess stain. I used about two coats to achieve my look. Allowing some of the natural cedar tones to show underneath will give the wood that authentic farmhouse quality. The stain will need to dry for a few hours before you can resume handling.   Step Four: Attach the Accent Panels   Image 6   Image 7Cut several strips of mounting tape and apply them directly to the bookcase section where the wood panels will sit. Pop in your wood panels and press firmly for a few minutes to ensure a tight bond. Add a few books or decor items, and your farmhouse-inspired bookcase is done!     Mateo Londono is a longtime contributor to the Krrb blog who also writes for The Home Depot. He likes to create DIY projects and provide step-by-step instructions like he did in this article. To find a bookcase that you can add your own personal touch to, visit The Home Depot to see their selection of bookcases.   DIY WOOD SHIM BOOKCASE  

DIY Slim Color Block Blanket Stand

  How to make a blanket stand As functional as it is chic, this blanket stand can hold several blankets while only taking up minimal floor space. The fun color block pattern adds some visual interest to your walls, and depending on the blankets, you can create a variety of interchangeable styles for your living room. Lean it against the wall by your couch for easy access to blankets on movie night and when the weather is warm, the blanket stand’s slim design stays out of the way. Supplies:
  • Two 1 ½“ x 5’ pine handrails
  • Four ¾” x 14” wood dowels
  • Miter saw
  • Electric drill
  • ¾” Forstner drill bit
  • Orbital sander
  • Sanding sheets (220 grit)
  • Wood glue
  • Four strap (or trigger) clamps
  • Rubber mallet
  • Paint and/or wood stain
  • Painter’s tape
  • Blankets!
Easy beginner woodworking projects

Step 1: Gather Your Materials

This project calls for a slim ladder profile with a modern, clean look. Because of this, I went with round wood stock and dowels, as they are lightweight but still sturdy enough to support the weight of a few blankets. Handrails work perfectly for the sides of the ladder because they have a flat side that can butt up against the wall without rolling.   Cut Dowels and Handrails with Mitre Saw

Step 2: Cut the Handrails to Size

Using a miter saw, cut the two pieces of handrail material down to five feet in length, and the dowels, which will serve as the ladder rungs, into 14 inch pieces. To help keep the blanket stand propped up against the wall at the right angle, miter the bottom end of both handrails.   Prep wood for stain or paint Step 3: Sand and Prep A quick sanding with an orbital sander will clean up any splintering on the ends and prepare the wood for paint and stain.   Drill holes for dowel rods   Step 4: Drill the Holes for the Rungs To make sure the holes are even, clamp the handrails together and mark out the placement for the ladder rungs. Leave enough space between the ladder rungs so that the blankets can fit. Once you have the placement marked, use a ¾-inch forstner bit to drill one inch into the handrails on both pieces. A forstner bit drills neat-flat bottom holes that are more precise than what you can usually accomplish with your standard drill bits or spade bits. The flat bottom holes will allow the dowels to fit securely and ensure the ladder rungs maintain equal length. Use some scrap sandpaper to clean out the holes and remove any stray wood curls.   Assemble dowel rods using glue Step 5: Assemble the dowels Squeeze some wood glue into the drilled holes and use a rubber mallet to gently tap the dowels into place. Repeat the process for the other handrail to bring both sides of the ladder together.   Clamp overnight Step 6: Let the Rungs Set To ensure a strong glue bond, use 4 flexible strap clamps (or adjustable trigger clamps) to place pressure on the joints. Clean up any excess glue and leave the clamps on until the glue dries, usually eight to 24 hours.   Apply chosen paint Step 7: Apply the Color Block Now that your ladder is constructed, you can begin adding a fun color block pattern. I went with a combination of finishes that draws your eye up, going from a dark matte grey, into a glossy green, into a light white stain that shows off the wood grain. Use paint-block painter’s tape to keep your paint and stain edges clean and straight.   Final Option 3 Step 8: Find the Perfect Spot, and Enjoy! Lean the blanket stand up against the wall and place your blankets on the ladder rungs. Have fun experimenting with different colors, textures and patterns to see what works best in your space!   Mateo Londono is an avid DIYer and vegan cook who has a passion for improving and personalizing homes with cool projects. Mateo and this DIY are featured here on the TenX Homes site, where you can find out more about creating your own unique space. You can also visit The Home Depot to find other wall decor accents to make your home your own. Pinterest DIY Blanket Stand Easy DIY Blanket Stand FB

DIY Industrial Reclaimed Wood Coffee Table

DIY fence board coffee table WM

We needed a coffee table, and I found the perfect-ish plan on Ana White's website. I used her Factory Cart Coffee Table Plan, with some size adjustments that I will explain. I wanted my table longer and not as wide as hers. You will also learn how to make the less expensive casters with plastic wheels look like the more expensive versions with some spray paint. This project cost less than $50!

DIY Industrial Coffee Table Woodworking Plans @savedbyloves

I am in love with how the table came out. So, where Ana's plan shows 23.5 inches, I used 23 inches. Where she used 44 inches, I used 49 inches, and where she used 45.5, I used 51.5.

DIY Coffee Table Woodworking Plans

For the top planks, I used 1x4 cedar fence planks I found on craigslist for free! 14 of them fit in the frame I made, with a tiny gap (less than 1/8 inch) in between each plank. I eyeballed the space. You could use a wood shim, or some other uniform object that is the same width as your desired space.

Kreg jig pocket holes

This shows the 4 support 1x2 boards, and how I attached the 1x6 23 inch boards using Kreg jig pocket holes.

Minwax Wood Conditioner

I attached the top planks to the supports below using my Ryobi Cordless Air Nailer and 2 inch nails. This nailer is a life saver and second only to my Kreg jig in terms of my favorite tools!

I filled the nail holes and any other defects with wood puddy and let that dry over night. I then sanded the table down with my orbital sander and applied Minwax Wood Conditioner. I love to use this before staining, particularly in projects with a combo of new and old wood like this one. It makes the wood take the stain beautifully and evenly. So glad I used it here!

Classic Grey Minwax Wood Stain

After the wood conditioner penetrated for 15 minutes, I stained the piece with my current favorite color, Minwax Classic Grey. This post is not sponsored by Minwax, btw! I just love their wood finishing products!

DIY fence board coffee table WM

I sealed the piece with Minwax Satin Polyurethane, three coats, per the instructions on the can.

Spray Paint Wheels on Casters

I couldn't find the exact casters  I wanted, so I bought these 5 inch diameter casters with grey rubber wheels. I removed the wheels from the metal bracket and spray painted them with Krylon Dual in Black Hammered. It bonds to plastic and requires no primer. Just my kind of spray paint!

free Woodworking plans WM

I love the warm tone of the cedar with the Classic Grey stain!

DIY reclaimed wood industrial coffee table WM

This is just what I wanted for the space. So happy with the result, and the low cost was a bonus.

DIY Industrial Coffee Table Woodworking Plans FB @savedbyloves

Let me know if you have questions!

How to Build a Dog Feeding Station

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of DAP Products Inc. for IZEA. All opinions are 100% mine.

How to Build a Dog Feeding Station

Today you get free woodworking plans and distressed painting instructions to build this custom dog feeding station. All of the wood in this project was scored in the Craigslist free section. I literally stalk this section daily, which has paid off in spades over the years!

Saint Bernarnd Puppy

This project is for our friend's irresistibly adorable Saint Bernard puppy, Willy (above). You can easily adjust the height to fit your animal just right. This was my first time using DAP® RapidFuse™ Wood Adhesive, which I am excited about for many reasons. You will be too! Let's get started.

Tools and Materials list:

Identical food and water bowls (They don't have to be the same size as ours, but need to fit in the space                               dictated by the width of the wood you are using for the top).

DAP® RapidFuse™ Wood Adhesive

¾ inch finished-one-side plywood - 10 feet

Kreg Jig and 1.5 inch Kreg screws

1.5 inch x 0.25 inch trim strips (Or desired wood for trim)

Glue, Pencil, paper, Scissors

Table saw and Jig Saw

Nail gun

Drill

Craigslist free section gave us a section of ¾ quarter inch finished plywood in perfect shape. The piece was dry, flat, hole-free, and large enough to cut out all the pieces.

  1. The first thing to do is to build the basic box using the ¾ plywood. Here are the dimension for each piece:

(2 Pieces) Front/Back - 12” x 23”

(2 Pieces) Sides - 12” x 12”

(1 Piece) Top – 12” x 21.5”

  1. Cut Bowl opening in Top.

Willy’s bowls were the stainless steel, slightly tapered ones with a little ¼ inch lip around the top edge. The trick is to cut the opening so that it is large enough that the bowl slips all the way down in but small enough that it catches the lip of the bowl. Seems simple but because of the slight taper it is a little tricky. Here’s the way I found easiest.

Woodworking project plansGet the bowl into position. For mine each bowl opening ended up being 3.25 inches apart in the center and 7.5 inches in diameter. You can set them however you want visually. Once in place, trace a line around the upside down bowls.

Drill hole for Jig Saw

Use your drill and drill a hole inside the circle large enough for your jig saw blade to pass through.

Insert Jigsaw blade

Using your jig saw cut out the circle you traced on to the top. The trick is to cut the opening so that it is large enough that the bowl slips all the way down in but small enough that it catches the lip of the bowl. If you prefer not to eyeball it, draw a circle inside the traced circle. If you’re like me, I had to do a little finishing touch with the saw and the sandpaper, in order to get the bowls to sit down nicely in the hole. BE CAREFUL don’t get happy with the cutting and make the hole too big. You don’t want the bowl to fall through!

  1. Drill Kreg holes into each piece as follows:

          TopKreg Hole Placement for Top Piece                                                                                   SidesKreg Hole Placement for sides of holder

Use Kreg Jig to Join Wood

For more info on using this jig, see my previous post: How to Make a Pallet Sign Using a Kreg Jig

  1. Assembly - Time to put it all together and talk about wood glue!

Wood Glue Tips

I had the opportunity to try out DAP® RapidFuse™ Wood Adhesive, and I won't go back to other wood glues! After just 30 minutes, you can plane, sand and stain wood. No more waiting 24 hours. No more not being able to stain. The stuff is also water resistant, so it's great for indoor and outdoor projects. The joint is stronger than with yellow glue or polyurethane glue, and doesn't swell, shrink or crack! There is no other glue like it. Seriously.

Wood Glue Application

Apply a line of glue on the side piece.

Attach with Kreg Jig

Attach the side pieces to the front piece first using the 1.5 inch Kreg screws.

Next, attach the TOP piece so that it sits inside the sides and flush with the top edge of the front piece. Also attach the top to the side pieces.

Lastly, attach the back piece in the same way you did the front piece. Attach top last

Now you have a box that is extra sturdy, with a recessed top that has holes in it to sit the bowls.

Attach Mitered Trim

    1. Trim – We decided to cut mitered trim pieces around the perimeter of the Top to cover the little seam and just add a little “finished” look. It’s totally optional. We make our own trim board by using the table saw with the fence set to about ¼ inch and then we rip 1.5 wide boards. You can buy trim board already cut if you prefer. We also mitered the corners but you can butt them if you don’t have confidence in your mitering skill. Just do it like you're cutting a picture frame and attach it to the box with glue and then small brads in the nail gun.

Sand edgesBefore painting, sand any uneven areas.How to Chalk Paint Distress Wood

    1. Paint - We wanted a distressed look, and decided to go with a stained top, painted bottom. This is a super easy paint distressing technique that you can apply to any project.

Stain top

I stained the top with Wood Finishing Cloths. These are super convenient as they aren't as messy as using stain from a can, and they contain sealant!

Dry Brush for DIY Weathered Wood Finish Tape off the top (pictured below). Apply your first base coat color randomly on all sides. This is fun because you paint in every which way, quickly and messily!

Dry Brush on Second Color

Once the first color is dry, apply the second color in the same fashion. I realized at this point I needed to tape off the top so I wouldn't get paint on the stained area.

Apply Final Paint Color with Wooden Block

A block of wood is a great tool for creating a chippy paint look. You can use a piece of scrap wood, or this fancy distressing tool with a handle. Just get a glob of paint on the wood, and drag it across your surface, repeating until you are happy with the result.

Create Stencil with Cricut and Paint Name

Finally, I created a stencil with my cricut machine and cut it out of white contact paper. I used a dark gray/black chalk paint for this part, applying it with a paint dauber.

DIY Dog Feeding Station Tutorial

Seal as desired and you are finished!

How to Make a Dog Feeding Station FB

Thanks to DAP for the great new woodworking product. I will be keeping up with them here: DAP Facebook, and for sure using RapidFuse in my future builds!

Visit Sponsors Site

DIY Reclaimed Wood Headboard Under $25

How to make a headboard from reclaimed fence boardsWant a beautiful rustic headboard that’s easy to build and easy on the wallet? Stick with this plan and you can have one in about 4 hours (if you have already prepared the “aging solution”… more on that later). The one we built was made to fit a queen size bed frame but this can easily be modified to fit your particular bed size. Let's do this!   Step 1. Decide on the size. As I said earlier we made ours to fit a standard queen size frame. The distance between the attachment points on a frame that size is about 60 inches. So we made the over- all width to be about 3 inches wider than that. This allows the two main upright legs to fall right on the frame so it can be attached with a couple screws. The height of the headboard is also a personal preference. We chose to make ours about 56 tall. I wouldn’t go any shorter than 40 and not too much taller unless you have an unusually tall mattress and box springs. Otherwise it looks a little overwhelming. Step 2. Obtain the lumber. We found some old weathered barn and scrap wood on the free craigslist site. The following boards were used for this particular size head board. The dimensions are approximate because reclaimed stuff comes in various sizes. So long as you keep the main leg rails and the back boards straight and the same thickness, you can use whatever you like. For ours: Main leg rails: (2) 2x4 x 56 inches Back boards: (5) 5/8” x 5.5 “ x 6 ‘ and (3) 5/8” x 3” x 6 ‘ rough sawn cedar or pine dogged eared fencing boards. Top mantel board: (1) ¾” x 3” x 6’ rough pine or cedar board. (cut to length after assembly) Trim Board: (1) 5/8 x 1” x 6’ board (cut to length after assembly) If you end up buying these form a big box place pick out the gnarly, rough looking ones that nobody else wants. They are super cheap (less than a buck and a half a board) and the take up the “aging solution” very well.   How to Weather Wood Aging solution: To put a darker, weathered look on any new wood that you may have to use in the construction of your piece, here is a kind of a neat and cheap way to do it. In a plastic bucket mix 1 part water and 1 part white vinegar. Place three or four steel wool pads that you have teased apart a little bit into wispy strands. Make sure the steel wool is submerged in the solution. Put the lid on the bucket and allow it to stand for about 4 days. Distress wood with vinegar When its ready to go, use a brush or a cheap roller to apply it to the boards that you want or age or darken. When you first put it on it will want to “bead” up on the wood. After a few seconds the grain opens and it pulls in to the wood and it evens out to a nice “wet” look. The only tip I have is to make sure you don’t leave a big drop or a splash on the surface. Make sure you roll or brush it out so that it the entire surface is evenly wet. It’s a fooler because it’s like painting with water. You don’t think it’s doing anything at first except wetting the surface…but in about an hour you will see what happens. Try some on a practice piece to get comfortable with how to apply it and how many coats. The more you do it the darker it gets. Less is more. Do this to all of your boards before you cut and assemble. Rip the 2x4 Saw Cuts: The only cut that you have to make that is just a little out of the ordinary cross-cut style is the rabbit cut on the leg rails. Don’t worry they are simple too, but it does require a table saw or a radial arm saw if you want to do it right. I used our table saw so that’s what I'll explain. How to Rip wood with table saw After you have cross cut the 2x4 leg rails to the right length of 56 inches, you are going to perform a rip –cut down the center of the 2x4 with the blade depth set such that it will only go half way through the thickness of the board. So that means the fence is set to 1.75 inches from the blade and the depth of the blade is set to ¾ inches. Rip the entire length of the board. Then do the other leg the same way. Now reset the fence to ¾ inch from blade and the blade depth to 1.75 inches. Fli the board 90 degrees and rip the length of the board. Repeat with other board. What you should have now is two boards that have a rabbit or lap that runs the entire length. This is where the back boards will sit and what creates the finished hidden edge when you look from the front of the headboard. Back of the headboard Next cut your back boards to exactly the same length. They can be whatever length your bed frame demands, and they don’t have to be exactly 60 inches for example, but it is critical that they are all the same. So cut the 5 wide backboards and the three narrower backboards all the same. Assembly: Determine layout of boards Lay the leg rails down on a flat surface ( garage floor?) and then lay the back boards face down between them so they span from one rail horizontally to the other. We decided to run a couple of the narrower ones in between the wider ones to give it a little less uniform look . You can do whatever. If you actually prepared 5 wide and three narrow boards for this you have plenty run down below where a typical mattress and box spring will sit. The idea is that you don’t see a huge gap above the mattress for the pillow to fall down in and that just looks silly. So measure your bed from floor to top of mattress and make sure you attach enough back boards to go all the way down past where the top of the mattress will be. Kreg jig pocket holes After you have laid the boards out and checked them for length and fit , you can actually fasten them into the leg rails. There are a number of ways to do this, we like to use Kreg jig screws. They provide secure, quick fastening. We put two holes in the end of each of the back boards to keep the board from cupping. We also used glue under the edge for added measure. For the top board, we used the Kreg jig to drill pocket holes facing up for the attachment of the top "shelf" board. After you have secured all of the back boards the headboard assembly is pretty much complete. It should be strong enough to stand it up and measure the final length of the top finish piece and the trim piece. We like to run the top “mantel” all the way from the outside leg rail edge to the other. Flush. The width of this top board will dictate the over hang you achieve. You can let it hang over the back and the front if you like. We allowed ¾ inch over hang in the back. DIY Reclaimed wood headboard Secure it to the top board using the kreg pocket holes you drilled along the top edge. The ¾ inch over hang of the top mantel board in the back allowed us to run a ¾ inch board down the back (perpendicular) to each of the horizontal back boards. We then screwed it into each of the back boards from the back so none of it shows (see photo above). This kept all of the horizontal boards even when viewed from the front and will tie them together as on unit so they don’t warp or bend apart from one another and create an unsightly gap over time. Reclaimed wood furniture The last piece to put on is the trim board that goes between the legrails and right up under the top mantel piece. This just finished the look of the whole thing in my opinion. Attach with small finish nails and glue. DIY Headboard Final finish Touch up anything you need to with some more aging solution and then seal with your favorite wax or varnish!

35 DIY 2×4 Project Tutorials

35 DIY woodworking plans for 2x4 projects at @savedbylovesA lot more can be done with a 2x4 than you probably think! Today we have collected our 35 favorite 2x4 projects to share with you, each complete with a DIY tutorial. You will see everything from mixed media art, to picture displays, furniture and more. We hope you enjoy, and find inspiration to raid your scrap wood pile!

DIY Wood Shelf Craft Storage

Woodworking Craft Room Shelving from 2x4s @savedbyloves

We needing some shelving in our new craft room. The space we had to work with was 81 inches floor to ceiling and about 15 ft. wide. We wanted something sturdy and easy to throw together. We decided to go with 2x4 shelving. It is relatively cheap, easy to work with, super strong and if you don’t go crazy with the screw fasteners it can be disassembled pretty simply if you need to move it.

Storage Ideas

The other dimensions we landed on were the depth of the shelves at 14” and the distance between the shelves of 13”. Once we had these picked it was just a matter of drawing up the simple design to maximize the space and minimize the number of cuts. This way I could buy standard 2x4 lengths.

Overall the shelving unit measures 68 inches (H) x 14 inches (W) x 12 ft (L). It has five levels of shelves spaced 13 inches apart and allowing a nice clearance to the ceiling on the top shelf. We were able to get all of the pieces we needed out of (23) 2x4x12’ and (2) 2x4x10’. The unit is held together with 2” and 2.5” # 8 phillips deck screws and wood glue.

Build Craft Room Shelving from 2x4s @savedbyloves

Purchase list:

(23) 2x4x12’                          2” #8 phillips deck screw

(2) 2x4x10’                             2.5” #8 phillips deck screws        Wood glue

Cut List:

(15) 2x4x 14 inch rungs

(6) 2x4x68’ ladder legs

Tools:

Circular saw or chop saw

Milwaukee cordless Hex impact with phillips bit

Milwaukee Cordless drill for pilot holes

Hammer

Measuring tape

Pencil

DIY Craft Room Shelving from 2x4s @savedbyloves

Ladder supports

The first thing to do is to build what I call the ladder supports. It’s obvious why I call them this, they look like ladders with the rungs providing the support for the shelf boards. This length of unit needs three of these identical ladder supports. So first using 3 of the 2x4x12’ boards cut (6) 2x4x68” pieces which will be the legs of the ladder and using the (2) 2x4x10’ cut 15 pieces 14” long which will be the rungs of the ladder. After you have all the pieces cut lay out one of the ladders on the floor and mark the legs at the point where you want the rungs to attach. Remember that you will be placing a 2x4 on top of these that will become the actual shelf surface. So adjust the position of the rungs so they are evenly spaced with the top rung allowing the shelf to be flush with the top of the leg and the remaining shelves to be 13 inches below the next shelf as you go down. (see picture). Secure the 14 inch rungs in place between the two legs using the 2.5” deck screws and glue on the joints. Use 4 screws per rung. We drilled pilot holes in the leg to make it easier to hold the rung and get it square on the leg as you screw it in. We used a really awesome Milwaukee power impact driver that made life really easy. It had tons of power and the torque settings were perfect to keep the phillips drill bit in the screw without twisting out, and not countersinking so rapidly that it splits the wood. At the end of this section you will have three identical ladder supports.

Shelf stringer boards

Now take the rest of the 2x4x12’ boards and place them between the ladder supports. Four boards will fit snugly within the 14 inch space in the rung. When you have a ladder section on each end and one centered in the middle at the 6 foot mark. Use the 2 inch deck screws to secure the shelf boards to the rungs. I find it wise to have a helper and to fix one shelf board top front and back and bottom front and back first. This will hold the whole thing together and upright while you set the rest of the shelf boards. Finish setting and screwing in the shelf boards and you are done !!

Craft Room Storage Ideas

We also threw together a paint storage unit with our extra 2x4 from this project.  It is super simple. Another ladder unit as you can see. We just measured the space and cut our shelves  to fit.

Remeber our DIY Custom Built-ins from Bookshelves...

http://savedbylovecreations.com/2014/11/diy-custom-built-ins-from-bookshelves.html

It was hard to leave this awesome set up, but we are finally getting settled into a new studio that we love!

Wood Pallet Cross Tutorial

Wood Pallet Cross DIY @savedbyloves

Today's project is a great way to use up those wood scraps leftover from previous projects. I will show you how to make this sturdy wood cross using pallet scraps and pocket holes. You will also learn how to easily create the chippy, distressed paint look seen here.

Wood Pallet Cross DIY

To start, I cut one scrap wood piece (2x4) to 18 inches and two pieces to 5 inches long.

I attached the 5 inch pieces to the 18 inch piece using pocket holes with my Kreg Jig (see How to Use Kreg Jig). The pocket holes are circled in the photo.

*Place a pocket hole on the bottom of the 18 inch piece for attaching the finished cross to a base. You want to do this before attaching the patchwork pieces in the next steps.

Folk Art Home Decor Chalk

I used Folk Art Home Decor Chalk to create the distressed paint look. It is super easy!

How to Distress Wood

I brushed base coat on thin pallet wood pieces and let that dry.

Create Chippy Paint Look

Using the Layering Block, I added more colors.

Create Weathered Wood Look with Paint

Lightly dragging the block across the dry painted board adds color in a chippy, random distressed fashion. Layer as many colors as you want, drying between each layer.

Patchwork Wood Cross

Once I had all the boardws painted, I cut them into random sized pieces and placed them on the cross. I made necessary cuts to the patchwork pieces with my mitre saw until everything fit into place.

Reclaimed Wood Projects

I glued the pieces into place and used my Ryobi AirStrike Nailer with one inch brads to secure them.

Reclaimed Wood Cross Tutorial

To finish, I centered the cross on a 2x4 rectangle and attached it with a pocket hole on the back of the cross and wood glue.

For more inspiration, visit our 50+ Scrap Wood Projects:

And our 50+ Wood Pallet Projects:

DIY Mudroom Storage Bench and Coat Rack

DIY Mudroom Storage Bench Free Woodworking Plans @savedbylovesOur laundry room is the high traffic area of the house. We go through it every time we come or go from the house. It had been crying out for a place to hang coats and to drop off “stuff” rather than haul it in and lay it on the kitchen table. One Saturday my husband decided that he was going to throw together some sort of a coat rack / bench that would serve our needs. Once he got me going on the idea it turned into a full blown re-do of the room. I have shown you the Free Laundry Room Printables and DIY Hardware Update, and today I am sharing how to make this fabulous mudroom bench/coat rack. This project was pretty easy once we got started, and cost under $150! We LOVE it. It is super handy, and it prompted us to paint and replace the floor in the room. It is now my favorite room in the house! On to the project. Shopping List 1. 3/4-inch birch-veneer plywood to build the seat box. Get one 4x8 sheet. 2. exterior-grade beadboard plywood to make the back panel on the wall. One 4x4 sheet will cover the area. 3. 1x16 solid-wood panel to make the seat lid. Get one 6-foot board. 4. 1x12 solid-wood panel to make the fascia board and shelf. Get two 6-foot boards. 5. 2x4 to create a support strip for the hinges that hold the box lid. Get 6 feet. 6. 1x4 to create the applied paneling on the front and sides of the box. Get four 8-foot boards. 7. 1x2 to cap the unfinished top edges of the bench box. Get 10 feet. 8. 3/8x7/8-inch panel molding to add a picture-frame detail to the paneling on the box and to trim above and below the beadboard panel. Get five 8-foot lengths. 9. ½x1-inch parting bead to finish the edges of the beadboard plywood. 10. 3/4-inch quarter-round molding to trim the beadboard panel and the base of the box. Get 16 feet.11. ½x7/8-inch decorative shoe molding to trim out the shelf, seat lid, and fascia. Get three 8-foot lengths. 12. 9-inch shelf brackets 13. 2-inch L-brackets to secure the box to the floor. Get seven. 14. European cabinet hinges to allow the lid to overlay the box and open smoothly. Choose ones that are labeled "for frameless cabinets." Get three. 15. Toy-box lid supports to keep the lid from slamming shut. Get two to support the weight of the lid. 16. 1 5/8-inch deck screws 17. 3½-inch deck screws 18. 2½-inch deck screws 19. 2-inch trim-head screws 20. 2d finish nails 21. 3d finish nails 22. carpenter's glue 23. vinyl adhesive caulk 24. 180-grit sandpaper 25. Shims     THE BENCH The bench I chose was modeled after a picture I saw of a classic entry hall built-in I saw on the This old house blog. It had everything we wanted; a place to sit, a place to store stuff, a shelf and plenty of coat hook space. All of this combined into a really nicely appointed, decorative piece that looks nice fits the room. We made adjustment to the plans to fit our needs where necessary. The dimensions were altered because our particular space required the bench to fit in a corner. Likewise, I changed a few pieces of the trim work to suit our taste. The shopping list I’m going to provide you will cover the better part of your project for the size bench we used. If you decide you want to expand or alter to fit your room then you might need to modify your purchase list accordingly. Here’s the one I used to start.
  1. Build and trim out the bench seat:
  I found the best spot in my laundry room was in one of the corners. So the first thing I did was take up the baseboard around the entire room. Next I just built a simple plywood box that would become the bench. No need to put a bottom in it. The box dimensions for my particular spot turned out to be 451/2 inches wide by 18 1/4 inches deep by 16-3/4 inches tall. Build this box out of ¾ inch “good-one-side” plywood. Try to get the box to sit as level on the floor as possible and fasten through the back into the studs in the wall using 2.5 inch deck screws. Just a couple or three places will be plenty. The Top of the box (which will be the bench seat is going to be made from the same ¾ inch plywood. It will need to overhang the box by about ½ inch on the front and the sides. But it will not go all the way to the back. ( you will see why later) Also, if your situation is like mine, where the bench will butt up against a wall in the corner, the top wont overlap on that side. So the dimension of my Top piece was 46 ½ by 16 inches.  
  1. Install the hinge support
Using a miter-saw, cut a 2x4 to fit the inside of the box along the back wall. Cut a 3½-inch-wide strip of plywood to the same length. Screw the pieces together with 15/8-inch deck screws. Position the 2x4 assembly along the back of the box, 3/4 inch above the back edge. Screw it on, through the box and into the studs, using 3½-inch deck screws. This piece will later be hidden by a plywood strip and molding. This is why the top is not as deep as the whole box. This is where the hinges are going to fasten. Screw L-brackets inside the box and to the floor, three inside the front edge and two on each side, to hold the box in place.
  1. Attach the panel molding to the seat.Next, I trimmed out the front and the one visible side of my box with 1 x 4 boards. This gives the box a dimensional, shadow box appearance. Cut the 1 x 4 so that the long pieces fit inside the two shorter upright pieces. This way you don’t see a cut edge. To create a profile on the inner edge of the 1x4 framing, cut panel molding to fit inside the 1x4 rectangles. Miter the ends of the molding. Nail the molding to the box, tight against the 1x4s, with 2d nails.
 
  1. Cap and Trim the box
Cut a piece of 1x2 to the width of the box. Glue and nail it to the top edge of the box front with 3d finish nails. Cut two pieces the depth of the box and use them to cap the sides. The side caps should now sit flush with the 2x4 assembly secured to the wall. Trim the base of the box using quarter round molding mitered 45 degrees at the corner joints.
  1. Trim the seat lid
  Using a miter saw, cut strips of ½x7/8-inch decorative shoe molding to fit the front and side edges of the lid. Miter the ends at the corners, but leave the back edges square. Attach the molding to the lid edge with wood glue and 2d finish nails. TOH Tip: To avoid splitting narrow wood stock with finish nails, dull the points of the nails with the strike of a hammer before tapping them in.  
  1. Install the Lid
Rip a piece of plywood to 2¼ inches wide and the length of the box This 45/3/4 inches in my case. Nail it down at the back edge of the seat box to cap the 2x4 assembly. This is labeled as the “Hinge support” on the above photo. Attach the lid to the 2x4 assembly using three European cabinet hinges, installed according to the "full overlay" instructions. This type of hinge allows the lid to open completely over the 2x4 assembly but conceal that same assembly when it's closed. The lid should overhang the box by 1 inch on the sides and front. This sounds more complicated than it is…Since your top has been cut short of the box dimension by this amount, you will have this 2/1/4 inch strip across the back that does not open with the lid. (see pic). You have to have this to carry the hinges. Setting the hinges requires a little bit of patience. The proper distance will be determined after a couple of openings and closings. There has to be a slight space to allow the lid board to pivot by the stationary hinge mounting board.  
  1. Mount the bead-board back panel
I ran the beads on my piece vertically. Since my bench was less than 48 inches I could use just one 4x4 sheet and rip it to the right height. In my case I liked keeping the board 4 feet above top of the lid. So actually you could purchase just one 4x4 sheet already cut. Where the bead-board meets the top of the bench seat I put a 1x4 trim piece to finish out the back. As you will see later, when I finish placing the shelf facia board later, I will put a matching piece at this seam. I think it finishes the back board nicely.  
  1. Hide the Bead-board edges
  I chose to use a small cove molding to finish out the vertical edges of the bead board. As with all of the trim in this project, take a look at the variety of Trim pieces available and get ones that suit your taste. There are lots and lots of styles available. Some will obviously not work at all and others will be great. There is no hard and fast rule to my knowledge. We often just use what we have left over from other projects.  
  1. Finish the Trim
I chose to use lengths of quarter round trim along the bottom edge of the box where it meets the floor. I mitered the corner where it wraps to the side. Take a look at your finished box at this point and decide if there are any gaps or spots that you feel like you want to cover with trim work or if just caulking alone will fill.
  1. Install the Fascia for the shelf
  Use a piece of 1x12 shelving board cut to the length of the top of the beadboard panel. This board will be called the fascia board for the shelf and will be where the coat hangers will ultimately goMount it to the wall using 2-inch trim-head screws installed through the studs  
  1. Mount the Shelf Brackets
  Measure and mark the placement of two shelf brackets on the fascia board. Using the provided hardware, install the shelf brackets flush with the top edge of the fascia board and on center at your marks.    
  1. Secure the Shelf
  Cut a piece of stock 1x12 shelving board the width of the bead-board. Set the shelf on the brackets and tight against the wall. Secure it to the brackets with 2-inch trim-head screws. Cut a 1x4 trim board and attach it to the top of the bead-board to fascia board seam. Attach with 2d nails. Caulk seams. DIY mudroom bench plans  
  1. Paint the Bench
  Sand the entire bench with 180-grit sandpaper. Fill all the nail holes and gaps between moldings with caulk. Prime the bench, bead-board panel, shelf, and moldings, then paint them with two coats of semi-gloss latex. Mudroom bench woodworking plans
  1. Attach the hardware
  Screw coat hooks to the fascia board, spaced evenly between the brackets.   Here you can see the accent wall we painted with stripes. Click the image or text for the FREE Laundry Room Printables!   Three Free Laundry Room Printables @savedbyloves